Abington District Court 1-38-04

Going before a judge in district court, or magisterial court in Pennsylvania, can be a nerve wracking experience. If you have been charged with a traffic violation, a municipal code violation, or a summary criminal offense, it is likely that you will have to report to your local district court. Additionally, district courts hear small claims (less than $12,000) and landlord tenant suits.

Generally, you will be facing a hearing, an arraignment, or a non-jury trial when you report to district court. And while it may not seem critical or serious to be summoned to district court, the penalties you could be facing if you are convicted in district court can be steep. Any notice or summons to district court should be taken very seriously, meaning you should take the time to contact an experienced lawyer to help you review your case and prepare a strong defense to present to the magisterial judge.

Some of the main offenses that are handled in district court include: loitering, petty retail theft, harassment, underage drinking, speeding, or running a red light. District courts also handle cases involving driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Abington District Court

The district court in Abington, District Court 1-38-04, is presided over by Judge John D. Kessler. The court is located at 1150 Old York Road in Abington, and it serves Rockledge Borough and certain voting districts of Abington Township (specifically, voting districts 1-1, 1-2, 1-3, 2-1, 2-2, 5-1, 5-2, 8-1, 8-2, 10-1, 10-2,10-3, 11-2, 14-1, 14-2, 15-1, and 15-2). If you need to get in touch with the court, you may do so by calling 215-887-2362 or by faxing them at 215-887-2364.

If you have been notified or summoned to appear before Judge Kessler in Abington, it may be because you have been charged with a traffic violation or a summary offense, or have found yourself involved in a small claims suit or a landlord tenant dispute. But whatever the reason you have to be in court, you should not take it lightly. A summary offense can result in a sentence of 90 days in prison as well as a $300 fine, if you are convicted and found guilty in district court. Although your sentence may vary, any time spent in jail or any money paid in fines can burden you and your family. So, even a seemingly minor offense can have serious consequences, and you should seek to be as prepared as possible prior to your court date.

If you do not know where to begin, start by calling our offices right away once you have received your notice or summons. This will give you and your attorney plenty of time to prepare your defense, so that you can be as confident as possible in court. Our attorneys have handled hundreds of cases just like yours in Abington district court and other district courts, so we are very familiar with the process and the best ways to demonstrate to Judge Kessler that you deserve a lighter sentence or even to have your charges entirely dismissed.

Don’t go into your hearing, arraignment, or trial in Abington district court unprepared. Contact one of our experienced attorneys today to assist you with your case.

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