Philadelphia Injury News

All about Speeding Tickets in Pennsylvania

When you are issued a speeding ticket in Pennsylvania, it means fines and points. Fines are quite expensive and a great dent in your budget. Points may lead to an instantaneous suspension or revocation of your license. Speeding over the legal limit is exhilarating for most drivers but being issued a speed ticket or getting points added to one’s driving record is bad. It will be a catastrophe if you are informed that your license is suspended or revoked.

Getting a speed ticket is not something to take lightly and you should take your situation seriously. If you want to get it over with, you might just decide to pay the penalty or if you think that you have not made any violation, you might opt to fight it. Whatever decision you choose, it is better to get a legal advice. Speed ticket injury lawyers have the expertise to guide you with no harm or little harm to your driving records and insurance.

Speeding tickets in Pennsylvania are equivalent to fines and points. Fine means money and more expenses, as well as additional points that can lead to suspension of a license and even a revocation. An excessive speeding violation will mean instant suspension of a PA driver’s license. With added points, a driver will have to pay an increased in motor vehicle insurance rate.

PennDOT keeps a record of each and every licensed driver in Pennsylvania. When a driver commits an infringement or traffic violation and is found guilty, his record is added points depending upon the seriousness of the violation. The minute the number of points in the driving record reaches 6 or more; PennDOT starts taking corrective measures.

A driver, under the age of 16, is suspended due to an accumulation of 6 points & more or is caught driving 26 MPH & over the posted speed limit. The 1st time suspension will last for a period of 90 days or three months; however, additional occurrences will last for 120 days or four months. This suspension is beside the points added in the driver’s record.

When PennDOT record shows that the driver has accumulated in his/her driving record 6 or more points for the first time, they will send the driver a written notice to take a special written point examination. The coverage includes knowledge in the following area: safe driving practices, Department sanctions and related safety issues.

The driver is given one month or 30 days to pass the exam successfully or the license is under suspension until the examination is passed. If the exam is taken successfully within 30 days, 2 points will be deducted from the driving record.

After reducing points, the driving record shows below 6 points; however, if for the second time, it again reached 6 or more points, the driver will receive a letter requiring him to attend a Department Hearing. At the hearing, an examiner will review the driver’s record and after the hearing, the Department may recommend one or more of the following: a 15-day license suspension; take a special day-on-the road driver’s examination or no action taken.

When a suspended driver is recommended to take an exam and passes the exam successfully within 30 days, two points will be deducted from the driving record after serving the 15 day suspension. If the Department does not initiate a sanction, no points will be deducted. If the driver fails to attend suspension hearing, a 60-day suspension will be ruled.

When a driver is convicted for driving at 31 MPH or more over legal speed limit, the driver will be required to attend a Departmental Hearing. An examiner will review the driving record and the Department will initiate one or both: 15 day suspension of license or special on-the-road driver’s examination.

When a driver’s record reaches 11 or more points, am automatic suspension of the driver’s license follows. the license. How long the suspension lasts is determined by the number of times license was suspended from the past.The suspension schedule is as follows: 1st Suspension – 5 days for every point; 2nd Suspension – 10 days for every point; 3rd Suspension – 15 days for every point; and Subsequent Suspensions for One year.

For every year of no driving violation, three points are deducted from the records. When a driving record goes back to zero remains at zero points for 12 consecutive months, any points given for violation is treated as the first accumulation of points.

If driving privilege is to be suspended, the person receives a written notice of the date when the suspension will begin. The driver has the option to appeal to the count7y’s Court of Common Pleas which must be applied within 30 days after the mailing date of the notice.

When a driving privilege is restored, five points will appear in the record without the inclusion of the number appearing before and during the suspension.

If you have received a traffic ticket, please contact an experienced SPEEDING TICKETS LAWYER. Protect right to drive legally.

 

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